If you’re an archeologist, then you’re probably not a fan of Graham Hancock, author, journalist, and host of the new wildly popular Netflix series, “Ancient Apocalypse”.  Just ask, archeologist, Flint Dibble of phys.org, who calls the show “an all-out attack on archeologists”.

Youtube Netflix Trailer
Youtube Netflix Trailer - Graham Hancock
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What does Graham Hancock believe?

Graham Hancock’s theory is that an advanced ancient ice-age civilization was wiped out after a cataclysmic event. The survivors of this advanced civilization then passed on their knowledge to the “hunter-gathers” who remained. Hancock asks, “what if everything we know about prehistoric humans is wrong?”

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From Grahamhancock.com

"There is fierce disagreement amongst mainstream scientists – a disagreement that also divides alternative researchers – around what happened to the Earth, and to humanity, in the closing millennia of the last Ice Age between 12,800 and 11,600 years ago. Marked by intense cold, global floods, and extinctions of animal species, this 1200-year interval is known to geologists as the Younger Dryas. Many of the leading investigators are convinced the agent of the mysterious earth changes, and of the extinctions, was a comet that struck the North American ice cap with globally cataclysmic effects."

Youtube Drones in the Wild - Lake Lenore, WA
Youtube Drones in the Wild - Lake Lenore, WA
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Graham Hancock Highlights eastern Washington including the Scablands, Wallula Gap, and Twin Sisters in his hit Netflix Series.

Even though his theories are widely disputed by the scientific community (and he admits this in the show) the series sucks you into a wild ride around the globe from Turkey, to Malta, to Indonesia, to the underwater road of Bimini in the Bahamas, and into North America – including the state of Ohio’s Serpent Snake Mound, and the eastern Washington Scablands, Wallula Gap, and Twin Sisters.

Youtube Drones in the Wild
Youtube Drones in the Wild - Dry Falls
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Graham Hancock believes the Scablands and the Wallula Gap were formed over a 10-day period by one cataclysmic event – a Comet that impacted the North American ice cap sending a flood of water so massive that it’s hard to comprehend. This contradicts the common belief that the scablands and Wallula Gap were formed over time by the Missoula floods – an ice dam that repeatedly formed and burst many times.

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Canva - Getty - Wallula Gap, Washington State
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The series on Netflix is absolutely fascinating and fun. And, invites you to open your mind to an alternate version of beliefs. Make sure to watch the episodes in order – this will be sure to give you the complete picture of Graham Hancock’s theory and of course, be on the lookout for the local mention of Wallula Gap, Twin Sisters Park, and the Scablands of eastern Washington. The official Trailer is below.

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Canva - Getty
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LOOK: See America's 50 Best Beach Towns

Every beach town has its share of pluses and minuses, which got us thinking about what makes a beach town the best one to live in. To find out, Stacker consulted data from WalletHub, released June 17, 2020, that compares U.S. beach towns. Ratings are based on six categories: affordability, weather, safety, economy, education and health, and quality of life. The cities ranged in population from 10,000 to 150,000, but they had to have at least one local beach listed on TripAdvisor. Read the full methodology here. From those rankings, we selected the top 50. Readers who live in California and Florida will be unsurprised to learn that many of towns featured here are in one of those two states.

Keep reading to see if your favorite beach town made the cut.